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Boo Paterson shows you how to load and unload a blade for use with Papercut This Book.

Enjoy this range of free downloads, just waiting to be brought to life with colour, from Millie Marotta’s Animal Kingdom, Curious Creatures, Tropical Wonderland and Wild Savannah.

 

Winners of The Batsford Prize 2017 ‘Interpreting Nature’

The winners of the Batsford Prize 2017 awards for art students have been announced at an event at Cass Art’s Islington flagship store. From a record number of entries responding to this year’s theme ‘Interpreting Nature’, the judges had the task to crown one winner for each of the four categories, which comprised Fine and Applied Art, Fashion, Illustration and, new for this year, Children’s Illustration.

Pavilion Children’s Publisher Neil Dunnicliffe took the audience by surprise while presenting the Children’s Illustration category, announcing that in addition to the advertised £500 cash prize, the winner would also be offered a book deal with Pavilion Children’s Books. A book deal was not originally part of the prize, but the work of winner Katie Cottle, from the BA Illustration course at the University of the West of England, made quite an impression.

Neil Dunnicliffe, Publisher of Pavilion Children’s Books said: ‘The standard of entries in the children’s illustration category was amazingly high and it was difficult narrowing the submissions down. We were so impressed with the winning entry, from Katie Cottle, that we decided to award a book contract with Pavilion Children’s Books as an additional prize. We’re always searching for fresh new talent, and Katie certainly fits that bill; we look forward to publishing her book shortly.’ 

Now in its 5th year, the Batsford Prize is an annual award organised by art book publisher Batsford, an imprint of Pavilion Books, and is open for students of art, fashion, illustration and related subjects. The winner of each category receives a £500 cash prize from Batsford. In addition, art supply shop Cass Art provides a further cash prize of £500 for the overall winner across the four categories, ‘The Cass Art Award’.

Tina Persaud, Publishing Director of Batsford said: ‘This year’s Batsford Prize has been inundated with entries and the standard of work has been outstanding. As the publisher of books on the creative arts, I am delighted to see so much innovative work that bodes well for my own industry and the wider British art world.’

bfprize

Fine/Applied Art:

Winner: Jemima Hall, Oxford Brookes University, ‘Temporality’
Runner up: Farah Ishaq, University of East London, ‘Mural for St. James’
Runner up: Nathan Walker, University of Derby, ‘Individuality’

Fashion

Winner: Valeriia Kostina, London College of Fashion, ‘Sensorium’
Runner up: Brittany Alker, University of Central Lancashire, ‘Alternative Nature’
Runner up: Evangelina Rodriguez Gonzalo, London College of Fashion, ‘Where the River Meets Fashion’

Illustration:

Winner: Shih-Hsien Hsu, Royal College of Art, ‘The Fragments’
Runner up: Andrew Wilson, University of West England, ‘Wool Gathering’
Runner up: Ursula Tolliday-Bolland, Cambridge School of Art, ‘Desert’, ‘Jungle’, ‘Mountains’, ‘Ocean’ & ‘Arctic’

Children’s Illustration (presented by Pavilion Children’s Books)

Winner: Katie Cottle, University of the West of England, ‘Home Grown’
Runner up: Anna Doherty, Cambridge School of Art, ‘Forest’
Runner up: Hannah Mitchell, Arts University Bournemouth, ‘Deforestation’

Cass Art Award

Winner: Jemima Hall, Oxford Brookes University, ‘Temporality’

Fine/Applied Art:

Winner: Jemima Hall, Oxford Brookes University, ‘Temporality’ (also winner of the Cass Art Award)

jemima

Runner up: Farah Ishaq, University of East London, ‘Mural for St. James’
Farah_Ishaq

Runner up: Nathan Walker, University of Derby, ‘Individuality’Nathan_Walker

Fashion

Winner: Valeriia Kostina, London College of Fashion, ‘Sensorium’4_Collection

Runner up: Brittany Alker, University of Central Lancashire, ‘Alternative Nature’

brittany

Runner up: Evangelina Rodriguez Gonzalo, London College of Fashion, ‘Where the River Meets Fashion’

Evangelina Rodriguez Gonzalo

Illustration:

Winner: Shih-Hsien Hsu, Royal College of Art, ‘The Fragments’
shi-hsen

Runner up: Andrew Wilson, University of West England, ‘Wool Gathering’
andrew

Runner up: Ursula Tolliday-Bolland, Cambridge School of Art, ‘Desert’, ‘Jungle’, ‘Mountains’, ‘Ocean’ & ‘Arctic’
ursula

Children’s Illustration (presented by Pavilion Children’s Books)

Winner: Katie Cottle, University of the West of England, ‘Home Grown’
katie-cottle

Runner up: Anna Doherty, Cambridge School of Art, ‘Forest’
Anna Doherty forest

Runner up: Hannah Mitchell, Arts University Bournemouth, ‘Deforestation’

Find out more about the animals that you’ll discover in Millie Marotta’s Curious Creatures with some fascinating facts about their diets, habitats and behaviours.

View the Creature Curiosities here.

Helen Parrott is a contemporary quiltmaker and visual artist who is widely known for her landscape-based art and intricate hand-stitched wall hangings. Her book, Mark-making in Textile Art, focuses on the act of mark-making as the fundamental starting point in design when working with fabric. We sat down with Helen to find out a little more about her work.

What is the starting point for your designs of mark-making?
I work with landscapes, often drawing on real places near my home in the English Peak District and sometimes using my inner landscapes of thoughts and feelings.

I take many photographs when I’m out and about in cities and the countryside and I make small quick sketches. These sketches are often the starting point for my ideas, although sometimes I pick up the fabrics and a threaded needle and the design just comes to me.

What textile work, past and present, inspire you?
I have been deeply inspired by north country wholecloth quilts since I first saw them, it was a ‘love at first sight’ moment in the late 1980s.  I also love Amish quilts, kantha work, sashiko and blackwork embroidery. Most recently I have been inspired by the work shown at the Cloth and Memory 2 exhibition at Salts Mill, Saltaire in Bradford (UK).

What artists inspire you?
This is such a long list! I will start with those I first discovered and carry on to my more recent discoveries: Agnes Martin, E. W. Nay, Peter Lanyon, Bridget Riley, Sue Lawty, John Virtue, Joan Eardley, Eva Hesse, Paul Nash, Thomas Bewick, Rachel Whiteread, Albert Irvin, El Anatsui, contemporary artists who continue to develop their work and grow creatively. The last exhibition I saw and enjoyed also inspires me for me while afterwards.

Where is your favourite place to be while stitching? And why?
On my sofa at home, with my feet up, in the warm, watching the weather roll past. The view is of our garden and the changing seasons, the birds and the sky. The subtle changes of colour and light always inspire me.

What would be the most useful tip for students who want to improve their design on textile work?
Try expressing what you are trying to do in words, either as a list of single words, as a sentence or as a longer piece of writing. This change to thinking in words, rather than visually, can help clarify what you are seeking to express and enable you to progress. There is a section in the book on working with words with some examples.

If you were on a desert island with access to just one needlecraft technique, what would it be?
Running stitch: deceptively simple to do, endlessly fascinating and seductive.

Maybe some kind person would let me have a range of needles, fabrics and threads on my desert island so that I can carry on making stitched textiles.

MarkmakingTextileArtHelen Parrott is the author of Mark-making in Textile Art (Batsford, £19.99)