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Design for Living: The C20 House Lecture Series

02/11/2017 6:30 pm – 06/12/2017 6:30 pm | Twentieth Century Society, Farringdon, London

The Twentieth Century Society’s autumn lecture series celebrates the recent publication of 100 Houses 100 Years, to which all the speakers contributed. The six weekly lectures look at what makes the C20 house so special and so different from what came before.

The lectures will explore how the design of the C20 house was affected by changes in the outside world, building and domestic technology and living patterns. In addition, we will hear about the trends in housing at the end of the century and the relationship between architect and client.

When: Lectures will be held on Thursday evenings at 6.30pm from 2 November to November 30th and the last lecture at 6.30pm on Wednesday 6th December

Where: The Gallery, The Twentieth Century Society, 70 Cowcross Street, London EC1M 6EJ

Tickets:
Whole lecture series: Members: £37 Non members: £50 Students: £25 (glass of wine included) 
Individual lectures: Members: £8 Non members: £10 Students: £5 (glass of wine included)

100 Houses 100 Years (Batsford £25) will be available at a special discount at the lecture series – cash only

 

Thursday 2nd November: Elain Harwood: What makes the C20 House special?

Elain Harwood will set the scene, talking about the social and political events that changed how houses were built and who developed them during the century. From Homes for Heroes after the First World War, to the expanding suburbs of the 1920s and 1930s and post-war structural innovation, C20 houses were shaped by outside events as much as by individual architects. Dr Elain Harwood is a historian at Historic England and author of many books, including the award-winning Space, Hope and Brutalism, and co-editor of 100 Houses 100 Years. Book here.

 

Thursday 9th November: Alan Powers: Space in the C20 house

How did the spaces of the C20 house change in response to changing design and living patterns? Alan Powers will explore the interior of the modern house, looking at how new concepts of spatial flexibility – and the technology that supported them – enabled new ways of living. Dr Alan Powers is a trustee and former chairman of the C20 Society and a specialist in twentieth century British art and design. His many books include Modern: the Modern Movement in Britain. Book here.

 

Thursday 16th November: Kathryn Ferry: Labour-saving homes

Kathryn Ferry will look at the impact of domestic technology on the design and use of C20 homes. The twentieth century saw huge changes in how houses were run, as electricity, indoor plumbing and ingenious appliances transformed the laborious burden of manual work formerly done by servants or housewives. Kathryn Ferry is an architectural historian, writer and lecturer, and author of The 1950s Kitchen and books on Seaside architecture, bungalows and the Victorian home. Book here.

 

Thursday 23rd November: Timothy Brittain-Catlin: Trends for the future

Since the latter years of the twentieth century, a growing awareness of the limitations of modern building methods and a fresh look at traditions have led to reinterpretations of modernism and the vernacular. What do these houses have to tell us about the future of the modern house? Dr Timothy Brittain-Catlin is an architect, historian, and reader at the University of Kent and vice-chairman of the C20 Society. Book here.

 

Thursday 30th November: Neil Jackson: The influence of the steel-framed house

The design of C20 houses were strongly influenced by mid-century American steel-framed houses, typified by the Case Study houses in Los Angeles. Neil Jackson will talk about these iconic designs and the British houses they inspired. Neil Jackson is an architect, architectural historian and Charles Reilly Professor of Architecture at the University of Liverpool. Book here.

 

Wednesday 6th December: Piers Gough: The architect and the client

Piers Gough will talk about the relationship between architect and client, with particular reference to his house for Janet Street-Porter, which features in the book. How does the process work, how much influence does the client have, how do you persuade them to accept what  you think is right – and how do you stay on speaking terms until the end? Piers Gough is an architect, writer and founding partner of CZWG. The work of CZWG also features in Post-Modern Buildings in Britain new book on Postmodernism by Geraint Franklin and Elain Harwood, which will also be on sale at the lecture. Book here.

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